HS2

14.02.18

Network Rail CP6 plan: Route details revealed

Network Rail has revealed further information about individual funding to its eight national routes following this week’s Strategic Business Plan.

London North Western is to receive the greatest proportion of funding, with £5.8bn earmarked for maintenance and renewals activity for the five-year period of the plan.

Then, London North Eastern & East Midlands is set for the second largest pot, at £5.3bn, while the South East will be given nearly £4bn.

The Anglia, Western and Wessex routes will all get similar funding pots ranging between £2.6-2.1bn, with Scotland also given £2.8bn and Wales apportioned the least funds at around £1.4bn.

The details build on Network Rail’s earlier announcement of its national plan, which include less major infrastructure projects than the previous control period and a focus on safety and reducing delays.

Officials from the national infrastructure manager said the focus on London North Western was needed in order to prepare for increased demand in London, Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester, especially with HS2 approaching.

“By improving performance and preparing for increased future demand for rail travel, our 2019-to-2024 plan will help facilitate further economic growth across all the regions we serve,” explained Martin Frobisher, the routes managing director.

“By moving our major cities closer together, notably with HS2 and the Great North Rail Project, we will continue to create new possibilities and new opportunities for the taxpayers and customers who pay our wages.”

In its national statement, Network Rail’s outgoing CEO Mark Carne explained that the way the organisation operates its renewals will be changing.

He said that contracts would now be dished out through a phased model of deliver rather than all being released at once near the beginning of the period. This is expected to decrease the effect on the supply chain and not “overload” suppliers.

New Wales and Borders funding

In Wales, where passengers will see the least overall investment in improvement and maintenance, Network Rail is working closely with officials from Wales and Borders for the first time.

Andy Thomas, route managing director, said the announcement meant “record levels” of expenditure for the newly devolved Wales and Border.

He commented: “The plan reflects our stakeholders’ collective objectives and supports economic growth, helping to connect people, businesses and communities.

“It includes the renewal of the iconic, Grade II listed Barmouth Viaduct and Phase 2 of the Port Talbot resignalling scheme, plus a significant number of diverse schemes to deliver as many benefits as possible for passengers at a local level.”

Increasing capacity and tackling delays

On the Anglia, Wessex and Western routes, there is an emphasis on both expanding the capacity on the network and dealing with Network Rail’s overall commitment to reduce delays by 15%.

Reliability is central to the national plans, with around £18.5bn of the total £48bn national spend allocated to maintenance and operations cost across the network.

Becky Lumlock, route managing director for Network Rail’s Wessex route, said: “This ambitious plan will help us deliver a more reliable service for the millions of people who travel on the route every day, from Waterloo to Portsmouth, and beyond.

“Our stretch of railway is one the busiest and most congested in the UK - we’re already running at capacity with 230 million passenger journeys a year, and that number is only set to rise. This investment will help us meet this growing demand head-on.”

Mark Langman, her Network Rail counterpart for Western, commented: “Passenger journeys will be transformed from 2019 with 140,000 new services each year across the route, better connecting communities and driving economic growth.”

Anglia managing director, Meliha Duymaz, added: “Investment in rail is critical to powering economic growth with more trains, faster services and better connections which is a key part of our railway upgrade plan.

“This also means greater demand on the network as we address the challenge of running more services while maintaining performance and reliability, which we know is what is most important to passengers.”

The regional plans, which can be found here, represent a more detailed view of Network Rail’s future actions than the national programme.

Top image: Network Rail

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Comments

Andrew Gwilt   15/02/2018 at 00:59

It’s all to do with improving our railways and how to look after the railways. Other schemes such as: Thameslink programme Crossrail (Elizabeth Line) Crossrail 2 HS2 (High Speed 2) project Electrification works Signalling improvements/maintenance Overhead Wiring renewals (replacing 25kv overhead wires) and 750v 3rd Rail replacements Track maintenance/repairs Level Crossing closures and level crossing improvements (including footbridges and foot-tunnels) Safety on our railways Railway station improvements (including reopening railway stations in the UK) and many more.

King's Lynn   16/02/2018 at 14:07

Yes, Andrew. Yes it is.

Don Sharpe   24/02/2018 at 13:26

With the exception of the electrification to Bristol, which cannot be realistically called the South West, where is the investment in the South West? As usual we are a forgotten region with only Dorchester & Weymouth on the very east of the region being electrified. The line from Exeter to Salisbury being still single track. The vulnerable main line at Dawlish still the only through route to the South West of England and Cornwall. Absolutely no movement in the rail line from Plymouth to Exeter via Tavistock and Okehampton, which would benefit travellers from North and East Cornwall. Where is our investment?

Manclad   25/02/2018 at 17:57

Why is the south east getting ring fences funding again. London has had £20bn spent on two new crosslink lines, it’s have no HS2 started there. Why can’t they start from the North for a change. Manchester has had £1bn spent on a bridge to connect two major stations, but we need extra and longer platforms at Oxford Rd and Piccadilly stations, for us to see the full potential but this is shelved. The south has had Thames link, new stations, station upgrades and expansions. Where is the fairness in the railway improvements. The whole country pays ridiculous amounts of money in rail fares and get nothing. Trains are ordered (brand new) for London, the north gets pacers and are over the service dates, electrification projects really needed shelved. This needs to change and soon to make passengers all over the UK see the rewards. Not just pretentious Londoners

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