The Sleeper's Blog

31.01.17

Scottish Borders tourism soars for the first time in 10 years – all thanks to rail

The Scottish Borders have seen “substantial” increases to its local tourism – and it could all be thanks to the region’s recently opened Borders Railway.

In papers presented to the Scottish Borders Council executive committee this morning, the Scottish Tourism Economic Assessment Monitor (STEAM) – an annual tourism data measure regularly commissioned by the local authority – revealed that, from January to June last year, visitor days in the Scottish Borders are up by almost 11% compared to 2015.

Visitor spend also grew by 16%, whilst employment related to tourism increased by 8% and the number of visitor days in hotels and B&Bs skyrocketed by a whopping 27%.

Overall, every single tracked category showed positive growth – the first time this has happened in over a decade.

“The rise in tourism activity in the Scottish Borders, both in terms of numbers and economic impact, is substantial for the first six months of 2016, not only when compared to the previous year, but also when compared to other local authority areas in Scotland,” read the paper.

Global Tourism Solutions, the company responsible for the STEAM data analysis, believes the most likely source of this tourism boost in the region, given the timeframe, is the positive impact of the Borders Railway and “its role in bringing staying visitors and day-trippers to the area”.

Scottish Borders Council’s Stuart Bell, an executive member for economic development, praised the findings, arguing that tourism is “absolutely vital” to the region’s economy.

“For the first time in a decade, the Borders have shown improved results in every STEAM category – the only area of mainland Scotland to do so for this period,” he added. “The introduction of the railway has undoubtedly contributed to these figures.”

STEAM’s findings even got a shout-out from Scottish transport minister Humza Yousaf, who said the government had always been confident that the railway would deliver “major economic opportunities and attract new investment”.

Passenger services were re-launched on Borders Railway, Britain’s longest domestic railway built for more than 100 years, in September 2015. It had originally been shut down in 1969 as a result of the Beeching cuts.

Since its reopening, passengers have been commenting on both how stunning the scenery is during the trip and how much quicker journeys are on rail rather than bus. In February last year, there were even calls for a Borders Railway extension as it was revealed the historic line carried half a million passengers within the first four months of operation.

Comments

Revolting Peasant   31/01/2017 at 13:01

Unsurprising that an accessible and 'new to this generation' transport mode, designed to connect people with places, has been proven to do rather well exactly what it was designed to! What needs to happen now is a well-designed capacity enhancement on the Tweedbank to Shawfair section, to reduce the impact of delays attributed to the single-track stretches, plus a prudent extension through Melrose, via Newton St Boswells and on to Hawick, to really unlock the region's greater potential.

Barrie @Railwayblogger   05/03/2017 at 10:01

It just shows the impact that bring back branch lines has on the local economy. We need to think about bringing back more branch lines and take some pressure off the congested road network.

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